2018 Endorsements

The Washington Housing Alliance Action Fund supports candidates who champion public policy that prevents and ends homelessness and moves us toward a time when everyone in Washington has the opportunity to live in a safe, healthy, affordable home. 

We will use responses to the below questionnaire to determine endorsements as well as potential contributions and voter turnout. 

To be considered for anendorsement, please complete and return the questionnaire via email to Teresa Clark by Friday, August 24.

2018 State Legislative Candidate questionnaire:
Word Format

Below are our endorsed candidates for 2018. Each candidate was asked to provide a 150 word statement about what they would do to ensure that everyone in Washington has access to a safe, healthy, affordable home. Read their answers below, and click on their picture to learn more about their campaign. If you don't know your legislative district, you can find it here.

1st Legislative District
Rep. Derek Stanford
Derek Stanford
House, Pos. 1
I look forward to continuing to advocate for the Housing Trust Fund. I will also fight for legislation to help prevent homelessness, such as Housing First policies, making surplus publicly-owned land available for affordable housing projects, and addressing the income inequality which makes it so difficult for many hardworking people to find affordable housing.
3rd Legislative District
Rep. Marcus Riccelli
Marcus Riccelli
House, Pos.1
Housing should be a right in this country--not a privilege. If re-elected, I will continue to champion the right of everyone to a safe, healthy, affordable place to call home. I will fight for important housing policies the same way I did the past two years to help pass Source of Income Discrimination and will work to promote fairness in evictions and tenant screenings. I will continue to advocate for increased funding for the Housing Trust Fund and other initiatives to make housing more affordable.
Rep. Timm Ormsby
Timm Ormsby
House, Pos. 2
I will continue my longstanding advocacy and efforts inside the legislative process to address the pressing and evolving needs in housing policy and funding. I began my legislative interest in housing needs as a member of the newly recreated House Housing Committee in 2005. As a committee member I sponsored and worked to successfully to pass HB 2163, Homeless Housing Program Document Recording Fee, into law.  My advocacy efforts in this issue area have and will continue unabated.
4th Legislative District
Ted Cummings
Ted Cummings
House, Pos. 1
I believe that everyone has a right to basic human needs and that includes shelter and security and I will do all that I can to provide those basics. I believe that employment with living wages and benefits is essential to a vibrant and healthy middle class and that is key to a healthy social wellbeing state of mind. I will do all that I can to see that Washington has employment opportunities that provide for a robust middle class and funding for social services for those less fortunate.
5th Legislative District
Bill Ramos
Bill Ramos

House, Pos. 1
Every person in Washington should have the opportunity to live in a safe, healthy, affordable home. When the legislature is discussing bills that will impact communities, especially of color, renters, and low-income constituents, we need to understand the exact impacts the legislation will have. We need to allocate money better so that these programs can continue to prosper. I understand the current pitfalls of unaffordable homes and we need to do everything that we can to ensure that there are affordable housing options when new homes are being built. We need to maintain the current affordable housing as well because this is where a lot of affordable housing is located.
 
Lisa Callan
Lisa Callan
House Pos. 2
If elected, I'll work hard to build and protect strong communities all across the 5th Legislative District and Washington state. I believe it's important our elected leaders understand that housing affordability and community wellbeing go hand-in-hand. As a member of the Washington State House of Representatives, I'll work hard to build and maintain affordable housing, improve our ability to get around quickly and safely, and ensure a better quality of life for the people of Washington state. No one, regardless of income or color, should be without access to a safe place to live.
6th Legislative District

Kay Murano

House, Pos. 1
Communities are stronger and healthier when everyone has a place to call home. If elected, I will increase the amount allocated to housing in the capital budget and seek additional funding opportunities. I want to ensure that budgets are passed on time so that funding deadlines are met and the process for developing low-income housing is not disrupted. I will introduce legislation to protect tenants from evictions without cause and work to solve the issue of increasing rents that rapidly outpace wage increases. I will examine foreclosure laws to return houses to the market rather than have them sit empty to decay. As a state representative, I will continue the housing advocacy work I have done at the Spokane Low Income Housing Consortium, bringing together industry leaders, politicians, and communities to ensure that everyone has a safe place to call home.
 
Jeff Holy
Jeff Holy
Senate
No statement provided.
9th Legislative District
Jenn Goulet
Jenn Goulet
House, Pos. 1
I will be a leader by working with stakeholders to protect people. I will support legislative efforts that help make and keep renting or buying a safe and healthy home affordable regardless of one's source of income, race, disability, etc. Closing loopholes that allow de facto discrimination will be a priority, as well as ensuring funds are available for programs that help make housing affordable and accessible for all, assist our most vulnerable populations, and curb homelessness.
10th Legislative District
David Paul
David Paul
House, Pos. 2
If you don't have a roof over your head, how can you get an education, mental health treatment, or care for your family? Given Washington state's booming economy, affordable housing has become a much bigger problem, even in a rural district like the 10th LD. As a state, we must make investments in the Housing Trust Fund and protections for low income people so they don’t become homeless in the first place.
14th Legislative District
Sasha Bentley
Sasha Bentley
House, Pos. 1
Now is the time we all stand up to ensure we have the basics we need, which starts with housing. LD14 needs a strong representative who will ensure we are not left behind during funding allocations and other efforts in housing and general community development. I am that strong voice. I work to solve problems at the root cause and will prioritize housing because it’s a large and diverse issue here; from homelessness to renting to affordable housing to a general housing shortage. We can boost our economy and create jobs while ensuring our residents are housed and safe. I will also work for additional resources that help housed people get the education, training, healthcare, and general support they need to get back on their feet. I will also focus on barriers to opportunity that still exist to everyone has an equal opportunity to thrive.
 
17th Legislative District
Tanisha Harris
Tanisha Harris
House, Pos. 1

Now is the time for all elected officials at all levels of government to effectively and compassionately address both affordable housing and homelessness. These issues are complicated and there is no easy solution which is why it is important to have people and stakeholders at the table to address these concerns and be proactive in their efforts.

As an elected official, I would sponsor, support and vote for legislation that creates stability for our low-income individuals and families, increase funding, and provide incentives for affordable housing and homelessness prevention. I’m in this race because I have heart, dedication to public service, and truly believe that the people of the 17th LD deserve a candidate worthy of their vote. My background in social services and education would bring a balance to the current Clark County delegation in Olympia.

 

19th Legislative District
Erin Frasier
Erin Frasier
House, Pos. 1
My family has farmed in Southwest Washington for four generations, and we’re raising our daughters with the same respect for land, people, and community. At Grays Harbor College and at the Washington State Board of Community and Technical Colleges, I have spent my career advocating for equitable access to opportunity for all Washingtonians, including in rural communities like mine.

I believe in common sense, local values: work hard, care for your family, and protect our quality of life. I’ve dedicated my career to helping neighbors in a changing economy - in Olympia I’ll fight for education and vocational training, affordable health care, protection for rural industries, and lower taxes for struggling households. With your support, we can ensure all Washingtonians have the opportunity to thrive.

21st Legislative District
Strom Peterson
Strom Peterson
House, Pos. 1
I am very proud of my work as vice-chair of the Capital Budget Committee to invest over $100 million in housing for seniors, veterans, youth, families, and so many more people in need of support to this fundamental right. However, there is much more work to be done. I will continue to work in Olympia and with our local government and non-profit partners to not only invest dollars into the housing supply, but to address issues around tenants rights, sensible zoning laws, and the myriad of reasons (mental health, opioids, sky-rocketing health care costs) that lead to homelessness and housing insecurity. With 30,000 homeless kids in our public schools, this is a crisis that will have impacts for generations.
 
Rep. Ortiz-Self
Lillian Ortiz-Self
House, Pos. 2
I have supported increasing the Housing Trust Fund, and any other bill that has increased access to safe and affordable housing. As an educator, I have seen the impact of homelessness on my students and their families. Stable housing should not be a privilege. It is essential that we continue to look for ways to partner with our local and federal community to strategically continue to find answers to our affordable housing shortage and to the problem of homelessness in our state.
Marko Liias
Marko Liias
Senate
A safe, healthy, affordable home for everyone in Washington should be a right for all, not a privilege  granted just for some. As a city councilmember and state lawmaker, I have been a consistent, determined voice for middle class families just like the one I grew up in. As a Senator, it's been my honor to promote legislation that expands and ensures affordable housing opportunities -- like when I co-sponsored SB 5182 to authorize a city and county property tax exemption program that preserves affordable housing (which meets health and quality standards) for very low-income households at the risk of displacement who can't afford market-rate housing.
 
22nd Legislative District
Rep. Laurie Dolan
Laurie Dolan
House, Pos. 1
A safe place to live is one of the most basic needs for all of us, which means that fighting homelessness and promoting affordable housing must be a priority for the state legislature. With Democrats in control of both the house and the senate this year, we were able to pass some important bills to promote these critical goals. Highlights included creating a permanent document-recording fee of $62, preventing discrimination against tenants based on source of income, expanding the eligibility for the Housing and Essential Needs Program, promoting the use of surplus public property for public use, revising asset limits for recipients of public assistance, and ensuring youths will not be discharged from public care into homelessness. With the right representatives in the legislature we can continue to make these important incremental steps to solving the housing crisis. I want to continue to be part of this vital work.
 
23rd Legislative District
Rep. Drew Hansen
Drew Hansen
House, Pos. 2
I chair the Higher Education Committee, and a major focus of the committee's work over the last few years has been (and will continue to be) making college affordable, especially by expanding financial aid, so that our students--many of whom are parents--can afford to get through school and get a degree to support their families. College students are like Washington residents as a whole; there are significant homelessness and hunger issues with our student body, and by making college more affordable we try to ease some of their financial stresses so that they can provide for basic needs like shelter.
24th Legislative District
Rep. Mike Chapman
Mike Chapman
House, Pos. 1
As Chair of the House Democrats rural development caucus, affordable housing and addressing the homelessness crisis is at the top of my priority list for the 2019 legislative session. I will support full funding of the Housing Trust Fund. I will support giving local government options to fully fund their homelessness plans.
Rep. Steve Tharinger
Steve Tharinger
House, Pos. 2
As chair of the Capital Budget Committee in the House I have considerable influence on the funding the state allocates for housing. This Biennial budget provided $106m for the Housing Trust Fund and tens of millions into rehabilitation and weatherization.
25th Legislative District
Brian Duthie
Brian Duthie
House, Pos. 2
I will seek to create a program that includes cooperation between cities, counties, and other communities in our region. We will need to address the complex issues that surround homelessness including addiction, mental health, and economic security. As a firefighter, ensuring a safe and healthy community has always been my priority.
26th Legislative District
Constance Fitzpatrick
Constance Fitzpatrick

House, Pos. 1
The growth in our region has caused a huge increase in housing costs, particularly hurting those who have lower incomes. We need to pass policies that will help create affordable and accessible housing options for everyone. I would have voted differently than my opponent on several affordable and fair housing bills put forward during the last session, including: preserving and expanding rental housing options for persons whose source of income is derived from or includes sources other than employment (HB 2578); a bill concerning access to homeless housing assistance (HB 1570); and more. I am committed to working with other housing allies in the legislature to make sure that everyone in Washington can afford to live and prosper in our state.
 
Joy Stanford
Joy Stanford

House, Pos.2
*two candidates are endorsed in this race

 
Over the last decade we’ve seen huge growth in our region, which has spurred a skyrocketing demand for limited housing options. As a result, families are being pushed farther and farther from where they work, and many are forced to relocate out of their rooted communities. We need laws that create new requirements for housing developers to ensure their construction is benefiting the community and not just their pocketbooks. Every person in Washington deserves to have an opportunity to live near their work and in the community they call home. I’m excited to work with the Housing Alliance Action Fund, as well as other partners and organizations. I’m willing to work to make sure this is a reality for everyone in our state.
 
Marco Padilla
Marco Padilla
House, Pos. 2
*two candidates are endorsed in this race

 
Once elected, I will ensure that everyone in Washington has the opportunity to live in a safe, healthy, and affordable home. As an independent legislator who will not caucus with either party, two things will happen: 1. I will make sure the needs of the people are always met. 2. I will not be beholden to a party agenda or a special interest. This approach will allow me to build relationships and find commonalities with all legislators as we look to find solutions “together” that will benefit all Washingtonians.
Emily Randall
Emily Randall
Senate
As a longtime renter, I know what it’s like to experience dramatic rent increases, having to move because a property is sold, and the struggle to find a rental that works for my family. As the third generation of my family to live in this community, I understand how dramatically things have changed, how much harder it is for families in our community to pay rent, buy their first home, and retire in dignity.

When I am elected to the Senate, I will be a champion for the hardworking people of my district, for my neighbors’ ability to keep a roof over their heads and money in their pockets. I will work with housing advocates to strengthen tenants’ rights, and to prioritize investments in the Housing Trust Fund, so that families in our district are not just able to get by, but to have the tools they need to thrive.

27th Legislative District

Laurie Jinkins
House, Pos. 1
Low-income residents should be given options in order to help keep the young, seniors, the vulnerable and disenfranchised in housing. Having options will ensure that people who meet these definitions have stability and can work towards improving their own lives. I probably spend as much time on this issue at my job with the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department, as I do when I am a legislator.  I have earned a reputation as a principled, collaborative, and thoughtful advocate willing to take on tough issues and get results. I hope to return to Olympia next year to continue solving challenging issues, especially revenue reform, so the state can afford to increase its investment in affordable housing.
 
Rep. Jake Fey
Jake Fey

House, Pos. 2
One of our jurisdiction’s most pressing social issues is homelessness, specifically of the youth in our area. I have sponsored, and will continue to support, legislation that provides resources and support for our homeless population, especially amongst children and students. I believe I have made a significant contribution to youth homeless efforts through my prime sponsorship of the Homeless Student Stability Act and work to improve the extended foster care system. I will work with colleagues on both sides of the aisle to increase resources for people in need of affordable housing options. No one should have to worry about whether they will have a roof over their head and I intend to make sure we address this issue on the local and state level.
 
28th Legislative District
Mari Leavitt
Mari Leavitt

House, Pos. 1
Affordable housing is a critical issue in the 28th district, and across the entire state. Too many people are not being given the opportunity of home ownership because the demand for housing and the price to buy are too high. As a result families are being priced out of the communities they have traditionally called home. I would look to bolster funding to the Housing Trust Fund and find ways the state can partner to encourage new affordable options for local families. Additionally we need to find ways to help make rent more affordable for those who may not be ready to purchase a home and bolster things like family wage jobs, and tax relief for the working class. Further, we need to work on wages as well as create jobs to assist folks to be able to ensure folks can afford housing.
 

Christine Kilduff
House, Pos. 2
My priority remains the same today as it was when I first ran in 2014 – to be a voice for families and opportunity in the 28th district. That includes ensuring that every Washingtonian has access to a safe, healthy, affordable, and stable home. In the Legislature, I will continue to advocate for adequate funding of Housing Trust Fund in the Capital Budget, investments in affordable and supportive housing, mental health facilities, and safety net services for neighbors in need. I will also fight to protect the rights of all Washingtonians, including racial equity, civil rights, and tenants’ rights.
29th Legislative District
Melanie Morgan
Melanie Morgan

House, Pos. 1
As someone who has lost their home and experienced homelessness, I understand the struggles far too many residents of the 29th are facing. Residents are being taxed out of their homes, going bankrupt due to soaring healthcare costs, and lack access to quality transportation, which creates barriers to sustaining better paying jobs. I think the very first thing we need to do is tax reform. We have the most regressive tax system in the country and its destroying families. We need to have serious discussions about a capital gains tax and how to simultaneously lower the property and sales tax rate. I eagerly await the opportunity to work with the voters of the 29th Legislative District to build an inclusive, positive, and civically minded district. I am committed to giving the people of the 29th the leader they deserve, and I look forward to earning your support.
 
Steve Kirby
Steve Kirby
House, Pos. 2
No statement provided.
Senator Steve Conway
Steve Conway
Senate
Everyone should have the opportunity to live in a safe, healthy, affordable home.  In an economy of rising property values, this has become a serious challenge for our communities with a rising number of homeless families. Traditionally, we have utilized the Washington Housing Trust Fund to expand the supply of low income apartments and homes. We must continue to use this fund as well as increase its appropriation through our Capital Budget. There however is a pressing need for emergency shelter as well to meet the increasing reality of homeless families and children.. This need must be addressed through additional capital funding as well. I should note that I have been successful in getting shelter funding for homeless veterans in Pierce County.
 
30th Legislative District
Rep. Kristine Reeves
Kristine Reeves

House, Pos. 2
As an economic developer for the state, I understand the need for public and private partnerships to foster economic growth and find equitable solutions for working families. I believe we need more champions for communities of color, renters, and low-income constituents. As a woman of color and someone who grew up in a family who struggled financially, I have the lived experience to advocate for folks who don’t have the resources or time to lobby for their interests. That's why we elect people to go to Olympia, and that's why I hope to return as your representative. If elected, I will continue to fight for the most vulnerable in our community and amplify their voice in any way I can in the state House.
 
Claire Wilson
Claire Wilson
Senate
Affordable Housing is one of the chief issues facing our state, and particularly this region. Homelessness is at a crisis level, and we need to address it with compassion and understanding. This issue is complicated and multifaceted with no simple solution, which is why it is important to balance the immediate need for getting people off the streets now with creating long term, measurable goals that keep them off the street for good.

By creating incentives to develop more affordable housing, combatting related crises like opioids and mental health, planning smart urban development, and improving temporary housing services, we can achieve real results with lasting impact. As a lifelong educator I always look for alternative solutions and will work alongside stakeholders of all backgrounds to ensure definitive progress. I want to keep King County and Washington state affordable for all.

31st Legislative District
Victoria Mena
Victoria Mena
House, Pos. 1
I believe that housing is a human right. Every person deserves a secure, healthy place to live and government has a responsibility to provide housing where the private market can or will not. If elected to the state House, I intend to fulfill government’s responsibility to provide housing.

As a state legislator, I will fight to increase the state’s Housing Trust Fund to pre-recession levels, and advocate for more. We need massive additional investment in public housing. The HTF is a vitally important way to make those investments. I will fight to repeal the statewide ban on rent regulation. Municipalities should have freedom to experiment with rent stabilization policies to provide housing to their communities. I also commit to empowering municipalities so it’s easier to build social housing and affordable housing on publicly-owned land. We must use every policy lever available to house everyone regardless of their income or identity.

32nd Legislative District
Rep. Cindy Ryu
Cindy Ryu
House, Pos. 1
I am serving my 4th term and seek your support for re-election. I chair the Community Development, Housing, and Tribal Affairs committee where many housing bills are heard. Previously, I served as Mayor of Shoreline, becoming the first Korean American woman mayor in America. I am a 49-year resident of Washington State and lived my earlier years in South Korea, Brunei, and the Philippines. I have a Bachelor of Science in microbiology and an MBA in operations management from UW-Seattle.

My priorities are to fully fund education, ensure safety of our communities, and protect our privacy, the environment, and consumers from predatory lenders. I will work to increase affordable housing units and access to homeownership, while fixing aging infrastructures. I will continue to advocate for small business owners and local jobs, and help make Washington a better place for us to live, work, and raise our families.

Lauren Davis
Lauren Davis
House Pos. 2
Addressing the housing crisis is one of my top priorities. This issue is deeply personal to me, as many of my loved ones have experienced homelessness. It is unacceptable that parents tuck their children in at night in the backseat of a car. And that some immigrant families are left out of many of our safety net systems.

I am deeply committed to dramatically expanding affordable housing, to investing in family homelessness prevention programs like that under the Best Starts for Kids initiative, to providing permanent supportive housing for our neighbors living with behavioral health challenges and to expanding immediate housing resources for victims of domestic violence. Incremental change is insufficient. I will lead with bold action on this issue.  

People with lived experience of homelessness have been the closest to the problem and are the closest to the solution. These individuals should be in leadership positions as we tackle this crisis head on.

Maralyn Chase
Maralyn Chase
Senate
The citizens of the State of Washington are on the path of acknowledging the universal human right that everyone is entitled to sufficient food, clothing, and shelter as part of the social contract we have with each other. Our state needs a Department of Housing and Development to construct and manage public housing similar to that in Singapore where 82% of the resident population live in temporary leaseholds of 99 years but ownership remains in the public domain. The developments contain commercial, recreational and social amenities including schools and grocery stores and much more. My committee is shaping a set of strategic objectives and key principles for an economic growth policy to secure the future prosperity of our state that aligns with our values of universal human rights.
 
33rd Legislative District
Rep. Mia Gregerson
Mia Gregerson
House, Pos. 2
I represent some of the most fragile communities in Washington state so I have had a lot of time to learn about which policies, procedures, and investments that have both positive and negative effects on the local communities ability to stay rooted in their home and neighborhood.  I will work with stakeholders and colleagues to reverse the trends that have hurt low income communities and communities of color. The state can do more to incentivize land owners to support local communities to purchase land, remove barriers for unfair evictions, and to provide bridge loans to help constituents to keep their homes safe and affordable for all.
34th Legislative District
Rep. Joe Fitzgibbon
Joe Fitzgibbon
House, Pos. 2
The housing shortage is one of the most severe crises our region faces. I will work hard to grow the supply of affordable housing by pushing for state dollars to fund housing construction. I will continue to work to improve land use permitting to speed up housing growth and I will push for cities to upzone and allow more affordable housing to be built, particularly in areas with access to transit. Finally I will work with housing advocates to improve tenants' rights in Washington by ensuring that landlords receiving housing vouchers must bring homes into good repair and by requiring just cause before a landlord can evict a tenant.

Sophia Aragon
Senate
From a public health perspective, housing is a key factor that has a direct impact on an individual's life span as well as quality of life.  What's important to me is to look beyond providing temporary shelter for homeless residents, but to really work towards permanent, affordable housing.  For children, this is particularly important because homelessness is a trauma that can dramatically undermine their ability to be productive adults. Therefore, it's important to address underlying factors such as access to mental and behavioral health. As a legislator representing a district located in Seattle and King County, I would leverage rising community concerns about the housing crisis to support a policy agenda to promote safe, health, and affordable homes statewide.  This includes eliminating any statutory barriers that exist to get in the way of this goal. Addressing homelessness also includes influencing operating and capital budgets to assure a level of state investment in resources to solve homelessness and provide support services for low income families, seniors, and those with disabilities.
 
36th Legislative District
Rep. Noel Frame
Noel Frame

House, Pos. 1
Housing instability is one of the defining issues facing Seattle residents right now. The rising cost of living, skyrocketing rents, and a median single-family home price of $777,000 make it nearly impossible for anyone but the extraordinarily wealthy to afford a home. Tackling this issue is complicated and requires all levels of government engage. At the state level, one of the most important things we can do is increase funding for the Housing Trust Fund, which is a proven model to expand access to affordable housing. Furthermore, I will continue to push for protections for renters to ensure that folks are not discriminated against in seeking housing, and that housing vouchers provided by the government can actually be used. Finally, I will continue to fight for economic opportunity because the income and wealth disparity in Seattle, and across the state, is one of the biggest contributors to the housing crisis.
 
37th Legislative District
Rep. Sharon Tomiko Santos
Sharon Tomiko Santos
House, Pos. 1
Since there are many barriers preventing families access to affordable and safe housing, I will sponsor legislation that would create equitable access for renters regardless of their incomes, race or ethnicity, and criminal background. I will also pressure the legislature to divest more funding to create affordable housing solutions, including public housing, that are truly accessible and equitable. I would advocate for access to safe drinking water and access to healthy food in our communities and ensure fair balance between interests of businesses and those communities.
Rep. Rebecca Saldaña
Rebecca Saldaña
Senate
As a State Senator and community organizer I fight for the right of every single one of my constituents to have a safe, healthy, and affordable home. As the former Executive Director of Puget Sound Sage, I led our efforts to develop policy proposals that keep people in their homes. We will work together to continue to increase sustainable funding for more affordable housing through Document Recording Fees and the Housing Trust Fund. We will add to our win to ban income source discrimination, with just cause and making it easier for people with criminal records to access housing. Together we are building a Washington where every Washingtonian has a safe place to call home.
38th Legislative District

June Robinson
House, Pos. 1
I have provided leadership in the legislature on bills addressing housing and homelessness and I will continue to do so.  In my role as Vice Chair of Appropriations I am able to advocate for funding for programs that address homelessness and basic safety net programs.
Rep. Mike Sells
Mike Sells
House, Pos. 2
Advocate for the rebuilding of the Housing Trust Fund as a member of the Capitol Budget Committee.
39th Legislative District
Ivan Lewis
Ivan Lewis

House, Pos. 1
There are basic human needs that we all deserve and should have access to regardless of gender, race, socioeconomic status, or other defining factors. We should all have affordable healthcare, clean water, food, and safe, affordable housing. These are the foundations that allow for quality of life and we should do everything in our power to ensure that everyone in Washington has these needs met. I will fight for single payer healthcare and to promote legislation and programs that ensure access to safe, affordable housing in the places that people want to live, work, and raise families. We make our communities and economies stronger when we afford people the ability to live well.
 
Eric Halvorson
Eric Halvorson
House, Pos. 2
Everyone deserves safe, affordable, healthy housing. While the 39th District doesn’t see the same level of homelessness as many population centers, it is still an issue. We can do better. There's plenty of debate about how to get there, but the bottom line is stakeholders must pull together to make it happen. I will listen and work for consensus, then push that consensus through legislation. There is no one single solution to the problem, but working together to find answers is a start.
Keith Wagoner
Keith Wagoner
Senate
In 2018, I was the sponsor of Senate Bill 6347, the goal of which was to provide incentives to developers to utilize existing structures in our cities to create housing. Particularly in smaller municipalities. I believe that the current high cost of housing is due to low inventory. It is my goal to drive down barriers to building.
40th Legislative District
Alex Ramel
Alex Ramel
House, Pos. 1
We need housing champions in Olympia. Homes are unaffordable for too many people. I know this problem first hand. Last year, I had six weeks to move, and found only one apartment within my budget that was near my son’s school. I was fortunate to find that one, and I know too many other families are not as lucky.

When I was President of the board of Kulshan Community Land Trust, I worked to make homes affordable. I was responsible for making sure the budget worked. So I know first hand how important state funding is. We need to bring the Washington Housing Trust Fund back to its pre-recession level and make more homes affordable for the people who live and work here. I will work to make sure that the state is a full partner in solving the housing crisis that is hurting so many people.

42nd Legislative District
Tim Ballew II
Tim Ballew II
Senate
*two candidates are endorsed in this race

 
My belief is that everyone should have the opportunity to live in a safe, healthy, affordable home. Affordable housing is one of our biggest challenges as a state and I want to do everything I can to provide funding for the Houseing Trust Fund and look at innovative solutions to address our housing shortages. I have a proven track record of taking on difficult issues and achieving right-sized solutions by bringing all perspectives to the table. You can count on me to do just this for affordable housing.
Pinky Vargas
Pinky Vargas

Senate
*two candidates are endorsed in this race

 
Everyone deserves a home. If elected, I want to be an advocate at the state Senate for bills and funding for affordable housing. I have been a local advocate on Bellingham City Council for access to affordable housing and the funding to help get us there. We need to increase the supply of affordable housing and add more diversity in housing types to provide an entry to home ownership. We also need to ensure continued funding for low-income housing, like CDBG Grants, HUD funding, and Community Land Trusts. I would also like to see county-wide initiatives, like the Bellingham Home Fund, which supports new affordable housing construction and rehabilitates existing affordable housing. There is no panacea, and this is a nationwide issue, but working together we can be more strategic and effective in providing more affordable housing. Everyone deserves a home.
 
43rd Legislative District

Nicole Macri
House, Pos. 1
Everyone should have the opportunity to live in a safe, affordable home and a community that thrives. My partner, Deb, and I see every day how our region's incredible growth is leaving many behind. I have been a leader in the legislature in protecting and expanding state investments in affordable housing, homelessness response, mental healthcare, income supports and services for low-income and disabled people, and in enacting laws that protect renters from discrimination and displacement. Outside of the legislature, I helped pioneer the Housing First approach, offering people a place to live and surrounding them with the support they need to keep that home, and make it national policy in addressing homelessness.
 
Frank Chopp
Frank Chopp
House, Pos. 2
No statement provided.
44th Legislative District
Rep. John Lovick
John Lovick

House, Pos. 1
There are few issues more important or that interweave and affect so many other issues. I will fight everyday for affordable homes and affordable communities. People need to live in healthy environments, and that means accessible child care, senior services, after school programs, public transportation, and healthcare services—and I will support and push for measures that help create these comprehensive communities. One of the biggest issues in the 44th District and our entire state is homelessness, and people understand that and will support reasonable measures to help our community members in need. The bottom line is that we need to put our money where our values are and invest in long­term, practical solutions that won’t break the bank, like more affordable housing throughout our state so no community is left behind. But my ideas are only a fraction as important as those of the advocates like yourselves who face the issues firsthand and on a daily basis, and I will commit to working with you to finally tackle this crisis.

 
Steve Hobbs
Steve Hobbs
Senate
All Washingtonians deserve a home that is both safe and affordable. Throughout my time in the state Senate, I have advocated for sufficient allocations to the Housing Trust Fund and fought to lift the sunset clause for vouchers. If elected, I plan on continuing that work.
45th Legislative District

Manka Dhingra
Senate
I have spent my personal and professional life building stronger communities through my work as a prosecutor at King County overseeing the Therapeutic Alternative Unit and my non-profit work, most recently with API Chaya and NAMI Eastside.  An essential piece of that work is ensuring that all people live in safe, stable, and healthy homes.
Now in Olympia, I want to continue that work as a vocal advocate for legislation, funding, and enforcement to give all Washingtonians that opportunity.
46th Legislative District
Rep. Gerry Pollet
Gerry Pollet
House, Pos. 1
I will continue to work to provide the funds and program support to our non profit housing providers and our Housing Trust Fund, while ensuring that funding is not diverted to less effective for-profit developers and landlords. I will continue to work to build family and homeless transitional housing in the 46th District, with wrap around services, while ensuring that we do not cut support for the emergency shelters that are needed by thousands of people every day and night. I will work to protect our housing residents from having to live in fear of federal deportation.
Senator David Frockt
David Frockt
Senate
I have been a champion of expanding access to housing during my whole time in the legislature. This session, as capital budget writer, I helped ensure that there was significant funding for creating affordable housing in Seattle, including $5.1 million for the Mount Baker property cleanup, and $1.5 million for the Valley Cities modular housing project in Auburn, which will help people transition out of homelessness. I was also the prime sponsor of the Senate version of the law we passed this session to prevent landlords from discriminating against tenants based on the source of their income. We have more work to do to. Next session, we need to obviously allocate more funding to affordable housing, make the regulatory framework work better for exciting new possibilities for affordable housing, and take a new look at the concepts behind HB 2437.
 
47th Legislative District
Debra Entenman
Debra Entenman
House, Pos. 1
There are not enough housing opportunities for families. Rising housing prices are making it so young people and low-wage workers can't afford rent or to purchase a home. Gentrification pressure is forcing older folks and members of communities of color out of their homes. We have to aggressively support funding for the Housing Trust Fund and our state tools while finding more local resources and laws that mitigate our housing boom for all people in the community.
Pat Sullivan
Pat Sullivan
House, Pos. 2
Communities across the state are struggling with the issue of homelessness.  I believe the Legislature must continue to look for partnerships with communities to provide additional housing opportunities. We need to help those struggling families and individuals find housing from short-term assistance to long-term solutions. While we have a number of programs in place to help address the issue, like the Housing Trust Fund, it is clear that much more work needs to be done in this area.  I look forward to working with communities across the state, housing advocates, and other legislators to make this a top priority.
Mona Das
Mona Das
Senate
In my mortgage business, I worked with many first time homebuyers in South King County. I believe that home ownership is one of the key factors that lifts many people out of the cycle of poverty. It provides stability so someone can start building a family and become part of the community.

For a long time, South King County has been a refuge from the skyrocketing home prices in Seattle and on the Eastside. Unfortunately, South King County is seeing that pressure head this way. I believe we can avoid the pitfalls of skyrocketing home prices that have plagued Seattle and the Eastside but we have to get in front of it.

Here's the steps we need to take:
1) Stop overrelying on property taxes for state income generation
2) Fight for more affordable housing
3) Better planning and more transit.
4) Allow local municipalities more flexibility with their rental laws.

48th Legislative District
Amy Walen
Amy Walen
House Pos. 2
I am committed to making our communities places where all people can live and thrive. As the current Mayor of the City of Kirkland we worked tirelessly on local housing issues. One of the reasons I want to run for office is to honor and continue the work Rep. Joan McBride has done in the affordable housing arena. Housing Trust Fund dollars, the document recording fee, and the ban on source of income discrimination were great victories. We still need to achieve more local revenue sources for affordable housing. That effort and the whole area of affordable housing will be one of my top priorities.

Patty Kuderer
Senate
I will work with stakeholders, advocates, and those most impacted to identify solutions that we can tackle at the legislature.  From increasing funding to piloting new programs, our state needs to be innovative and show leadership on these critical issues. With homelessness on the rise in King County, we cannot continue to push these issues under the rug and hope that our cities and counties have the tools and resources they need to make a difference.  The state needs to step up it's commitment on affordable housing and I will be proud to work with you on that front.